The Arachnid Order Solifugae
 

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COLLECTIONS/RESEARCH

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Globel Survey/Inventory

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databas
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Collecting Techniques
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Global Survey and Inventory of Solifugae
Database

The Global Survey and Inventory of Solifugae Database is incorporated into a larger customized MYSQL database, developed at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) for an NSF-funded Planetary Biodiversity Inventory of Miridae project and maintained on one of the AMNH servers.  A fast, convenient, web-browser interface has been adapted for use in the solifuge project, and is ideal for archiving data in museums or in the field (see tutorial).  Project participants can enter data and upload digital images into the system from anywhere in the world, and these data and images are instantly transferable via the internet.  Subsets of the data (e.g. georeferenced records for mapping and spatial analysis) can be exported, and reports (e.g. lists of material examined) can be generated automatically.  Digital images and taxonomic, geographical, phylogenetic and literary data concerning solifuges are, or will be, available as well.  Within the database, each specimen or specimen-lot (conspecific individuals collected at the same locality on the same date) has a unique identifier in the database that is cross-referenced with an accession or catalog number at an official repository (such as a museum or university collection).  Each digital image is, or will be, correlated with the identifier, and multiple images are sub-coded to allow easy association between images, data, and publications citing the specimen.  Through forthcoming links to the Discover Life website, the database will enable simple, interactive, online mapping of distributions.  Passing your cursor over the distribution points on the distribution maps will retrieve their geographic coordinates, while clicking on them will provide detailed specimen data.  In order to prevent corruption of the data, access to the data entry screens is restricted to project participants, although archived data will be made accessible to the public in a variety of venues.

ACCESS DATABASE

We thank Randall T. Schuh for making the PBI Specimen Database structure available for this project, and Sheridan Hewson-Smith for assistance and advice with the database, and with many related issues (e.g. unique lot identifiers).  We thank John Pickering and the team at Discover Life for providing tools for mapping, producing identification keys, and related applications via the Discover Life website.

 



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